HE IS RISEN!

In a way, Easter is a birthday celebration. Jesus’ calculated birth is said to have been between March 21st and May 29th, April 24th being between. As for the date we celebrate His birth, December 25th, it seems that date was borrowed from pagan holidays. It was thought that more pagans would be open to that god if it coincided with their holidays. So, in truth, spring marks Jesus’ birth into the world, as well as His death and resurrection out of it.

For my Easter article, and since today is Good Friday, I want to share a posting from Kari Browning, author of Unsealing Ancient Mysteries, clarifying some other misconceptions:

“In some Christian congregations, “Good Friday” is celebrated as the day Jesus was crucified. Actually, Jesus had to be crucified on a Thursday in order for Him to be in the ground three days and three nights and to rise on the first day of the week (Sunday).

For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth. (Matthew 12:40)

Now on the first day of the week (Sunday) Mary Magdalene went to the tomb early, while it was still dark, and saw that the stone had been taken away from the tomb. (John 20:1)

So, why do we celebrate the crucifixion on “Good Friday” if Jesus was actually crucified on a Thursday? The confusion is because the Church, for the most part, does not understand festival language or Hebraic customs.

This confusion stems from John 19:31, that states Jesus’ body had to be taken down from the cross because the next day was the Sabbath. The first day of the Festival of Unleavened Bread is considered a Shabbaton (a high Sabbath). This verse wasn’t referring to the weekly Sabbath (Friday at Sundown to Saturday at Sundown), but to the high Sabbath that was on Friday, Aviv 15, that year.”

HE IS RISEN!

(To learn more and understand the festival language of the Bible, you can purchase Kari’s book, Unsealing Ancient Mysteries, on Amazon.)