For Everything, There Is A Season

Perfect time

So often when things change in our lives, we have such a resistance to the change. This is because when people see a big change appearing they are often fearful that it is something bad. But it is important to remember that when something big changes in our lives, it means something better is coming.

There cannot be a vacuum in the Universe, and so as something moves out, something must come in and replace it.

When change comes, relax, have total faith, and know that the change is ALL GOOD.http://bit.ly/1ClUDSl

Thoughts of Change

Quote Success relearnRecently, my sister posed the question: “What brings you alive?” which made me think:

Before my chariot, discovery was my high. It was one of adventure’s draws: exploring hidden paths, and back roads; climbing trees, rooftops, and to the top of a mast; lying upon the earth pondering the heavens; studying world maps. But, after considering her question, I don’t think that what enervates me has really changed. It used to be by physical dexterity; now, it’s through imagination and thinking skills.

I come alive when faced with a quandary—a need to “discover” a solution. I light up with each “aha:” a new idea…thinking outside of the box.

Whether faced with a barrier (or, simply, figuring out how to safely clean up shattered glass from a dropped bowl), writing, decorating, repurposing, for myself and others…whatever, I come alive when faced with a problem. That’s adventure! J

For this upcoming New Year of 2015, join with me in discovering contentment. YES! Contentment.

Happiness is an inside job. It’s a bi-product of fulfillment, and fulfillment is in your hands. Not in your spouse, your children, your youth…job…achievement…but in the realization that you are the current to “aliveness,” your life rhythm.

The body’s melody is reflective of its thoughts, whose frequency determines its health. You’re the note determining the duration (endurance) and pitch (atmospheric attitude) of events for the beat of your life.

Maybe music isn’t your language. Does gardening speak to you? What have you cultivated? Paradise lost or paradise found?

Weeds of discontent require pulling. Floods of self-indulgence need irrigating. The infested, stagnant pool of unforgiveness needs unclogging.

Refresh gloomy thoughts with winds of change!

“Mindfully,” choose life!

HOW TO BE THE BEST YOU is my book on ‘how-to’ rediscover your heart and change your stinkin’ thinkin’ in order to find happiness. It’s an elementary outline to simplify needful changes. You can order it off amazon or here: http://booklocker.com/books/6811.html

 

 

Don’t Worry. Be Happy

Photo Tiny and friendIf you cannot agree with others, you can at least refrain from quarreling with them.

“When involved in a dispute with someone…it may be the only time doing nothing is better than doing something….When you quarrel with others—even if you win the argument—you place a great deal of unnecessary stress upon yourself. It is impossible to maintain a Positive Mental Attitude when you allow negative emotions, such as anger or hate, to dominate your thoughts. No one can upset you or make you angry…unless you allow them to do so.

Instead of arguing with others, try asking nonthreatening questions, such as:

“Why do you feel this way?

What have I done to make you angry?

What can I do to help?”

You may find that the entire situation has resulted from a simple misunderstanding that can be quickly rectified. Even if problems are more serious, your positive behavior will go a long way toward helping resolve them.” –Law of Attraction/Motivation quote 

Think positive thoughts.

Laugh out loud.

Love always.

You’ll never regret it!

Earthing: Barefootin’s Benefits

Okay, spring is here. We may still have some temperature dips, but this is a Health Alert about going barefoot; not that it’s bad for you. This is an announcement that it’s good for you!

I remember the good ol’ days when it was acceptable to go barefoot. In fact, my shoes (and books) remained where they were flung after hopping off the school bus on my way to shimmy up a pear tree or climb to the top of the barn! Shoes were an encumbrance to my speed and a major impedance to my climbing skills. And as important: my feet needed to breathe!

The benefits of barefootin’ was the topic of this month’s newsletter, “Chariot Notes,” that went out this past Wednesday.  For those of you not on my mailing list, here’s a smattering…and then some.

Since the invention of plastics in the 60’s, there’s been an increase of inflammation-related health disorders. We moved from leather-soled shoes, and wooden floors, to synthetic-soled shoes, synthetic carpets, and linoleum, which left our bodies depleted of electrons! Our autoimmune systems have become compromised. “Earthing,” or walking barefoot, reduces oxidative stress.

The earth naturally carries a negative ionic charge, so when we are grounded with the earth, free radicals are neutralized in your body. It has been proven that negative ions not only detoxify and calm the body, but also reduce stress and inflammation.

A second benefit is reflexology. Because there are reflex points corresponding to every organ in the body on the soles of our feet, barefooting offers a free reflexology session…helping to relieve what ails ya’. If there’s initial tenderness, it will subside as your body adjusts.

In addition, going barefoot offers a dual reprieve from a fast-paced lifestyle. First, you’re out-and-away from business, taking an opportunity to unwind. At the same time, you must be present, giving attention to where you step, living in the moment. And, research has proven a 62% decrease in anxiety and depression, increasing those feel-good endorphins. Simply quieting the mental chatter relaxes the mind, body, and spirit.

Whether walking in the grass, on the bare earth, or in the sand, connect with Mother Nature, and her Creator. Feel the warm sunshine on your face. Smell the flowers. Listen to the wind in the trees, and the bird’s enchanting songs. How wondrous are our senses!

Even now, I go barefoot from April through October. Maybe I can’t pound the earth with my feet, but I can prop them up on rocks, or tree roots, while I tune in to earth’s harmony and commune with my Father. Sometimes, I even extend my legs and slide down in my chair just to feel the cool grass under my toes.

Remember, I’m from Tennessee. You can take the country bumpkin out of Tennessee, but you can’t take the country bumpkin-ness out of this Tennessean. (To read about my superintendent reprimanding me for going barefoot in the “My Daisy Dukes” chapter of Views From My Chariot, you can order it here http://booklocker.com/books/6235.html or off Amazon.com.

So today, for your health and happiness, I’m suggesting a barefoot stroll. Be rejuvenated!

 

 

Hungry Minds and Open Eyes

“There is nothing you can learn from as much as a problem you cannot fully solve. Unsolved problems can be some of the greatest tormentors, but also the greatest teachers. Unsolved problems keep the mind hungry and the eyes open.” –Jonathan Zap

The intention for my “Journey to Wholeness” series (January 3rd through March 14th) was to break mindsets, stimulate curiosity, and bring enlightenment to well-being—being well physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually. It was a nudge to NOT get caught up in labels—“short, fat, narrow-minded, empty-headed, New Age”—but to remain open-minded, non-judgmental of “other-mindedness.”

When we think we know the mind of God, spiritual growth is thwarted, and there’s no need for faith. It’s like a marksman or sharpshooter cutting off his trigger finger. He has no further use of his rifle.

By his writings, it seems that Nietzsche lost his faith at the age of 20. Regarding such, here is what he wrote in a letter to his sister: “Hence the ways of men part: if you wish to strive for peace of soul and pleasure, then believe; if you wish to be a devotee of truth, then inquire…”

Was that his last hypothesis after meeting God, again? Who are we to judge?

My point: we have each suffered disillusionments from the actions, words, or behaviors of another human being, but that’s no reason to throw in the towel on all humanity. The same goes for not receiving the answer you expected, or desired, from your prayers, life plan, or religion. Continue seeking answers to these “unresolved problems.” Like Zap said, use them as your teachers.

It’s been a week since my series ended. I feel a responsibility to keep your brain from going mushy, so-o-o the last link in my article is to help you keep a hungry mind and open eyes.

Here are a couple of the author’s quotes (Gary ‘Z’ McGee, taken from his “Waking Times”) to prime your mind:

“From microcosm to macrocosm we are infinite beings perceiving an infinite reality using finite faculties.” (That’s us humans trying to figure out the universes, using our mere intellect—devoid of spirituality.)

“Atoms consist of 99.9999999% empty space. That means: everything from the chair you’re sitting on, the computer you’re staring at, even you, are only .000000001% there.” (If you read this for the second time, and no one’s there to witness it, does that mean you’re not there either? Huh?!)

Okay, back to another dimension. Here’s a two-minute exert of theoretical physicist, Dr. Michio Kaku (my second favorite physicist, after “Mysteries of the Universe” narrator, Brian Cox, on the Science Channel), answering Andre Lapiere’s question: “Are there only three dimensions in other universes or could there be more?”

http://bigthink.com/videos/the-multiverse-has-11-dimensions-2

HIP-HIP-HORRAY, for big thinkers!

If any of this intrigues you, here’s a DEEP, humorous rabbit hole…one curious click after another. Be forewarned:

“You are traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. A journey into a wondrous land of imagination. Next stop, the Twilight Zone!” (Season 3 of Twilight Zone-introduction by Rod Serling)

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2014/02/24/three-unexplained-scientific-concepts-can-make-us-spiritual/

Seconds…anyone…?

SCI and The Law of Possibility

At one time or another, most of us have used a crutch or have used something as a ‘crutch.’ Whether as a prop or for support, I think when our lives are newly interrupted by disability, denial is as good a crutch as a crutch.

In the beginning—the first ten years—I used it (denial) to my advantage. I wasn’t going to be in a wheelchair the rest of my life and tried to live as if I were still able-bodied; but, obviously, needed help because of my disability. Others telling me how I inspired them wasn’t a help. My wake-up call, out of denial’s slumber, was realizing my pride and stubbornness.

Yes, I charged back into work, and being independent, but I look back at the foolishness of thinking I was more capable than I was, putting myself, and others, at risk.

There were several falls: a back flip off the toilet, a nose-plant onto my pantry floor, a “…tilt me over and pour me out” in my carport, and a semi-twirl off my back porch. The law of universal gravitation is especially cruel to those of us with effected muscular function/responses. Dead weight falls hard. Why hasn’t someone invented an ‘Iron Man’-like rocket boost for wheelchairs?

Anyway, the most dangerous denial was ignoring signs of autonomic dysreflexia (also known as hyperreflexia). http://calder.med.miami.edu/pointis/automatic.html

Autonomic dysreflexia in the SCI has numerous stimuli but most commonly results from an extended bladder or UTI (urinary tract infection), over-exposure in hot weather, constipation, and pain. I would ignore symptoms until a rocketing blood pressure-induced migraine escalated into distorted s-l-o-w m-o-t-i-o-n speech, always requiring emergency assistance. If not treated, stroke, coma, and death can result.

Time, experience, and gained confidence work out the need for ‘crutches,’ but facing the truth on the wings of hope deals with denial.

Whether we improve physically or not, emotionally we can get better, day by day. If you lean on a crutch in the transition, that’s okay. If you’re honestly seeking to fit the puzzle pieces together for adjustment, this fellow SCI even recommends it. A little propping up, a little assistive support, goes a long way on the flight of optimism.

After all these years, those initial ailments have either changed or improved. More importantly, I’ve become wiser dealing with new ones.

I’ve learned: that opportunities are peeking out from under every weight of limitation, and that some things are “in our head:” Possibilities.

“The Law of Possibility:” the unaffected space of weightlessness in the aerodynamic mind where possibilities abound, and gravity has no influence!

 

 

 

Happiness Is A Choice

It’s no secret; I’m as much of a shut-in as you can be. Not as in being a hermit, because I love having friends and family come for visits in my home, but predominately from repercussions of disability. In light of my circumstances, someone recently asked what keeps me happy; what brings me happiness?

There are a myriad of things that bring me happiness. (You can enjoy many of my other delights in Views From My Chariot: A Wheelchair Oddity http://booklocker.com/books/6235.html .) But today’s happy topic is my cats.

I’ve had all three of my cats since my SCI, so they think it’s totally normal to live from a wheelchair; although, only two of them take advantage of 24/7 lap privilege.

They make me laugh many times a day at their crazy antics, cute faces, quirky behaviors, and expected responses. They are so-o-o predictable. Aside from the mere joys of having a pet, they’re also good for my health. Laughter is always good for what ails me, and stroking my pets lowers blood pressure.

Did you know that animals provide us with similar social support as people do? Although just like people, my cats sometimes make me cuss!

I know. I know. I’m trying to quit. But I promise I’m making progress. Recently, I was telling my sister about something frustrating that had happened. I don’t remember if it was something I had dropped, broken, or spilled OR if it was the day my 21½ year old female feline pranced, with intention, into my bedroom, raised her fluffy tail, and peed on an antique oriental rug.

Anyway, as a response to my dismay, she asked if I cussed. When I proudly remembered that I hadn’t, she said, “Wow, that would have been the right time to.” So much for my support system!

In my sixty-odd years of loving and observing animals, I know they have the capacity to understand and obey instruction (and disobey), retain good and bad memories thus, make associations, communicate with each other and us, if we choose to listen and observe.

For example, one day when all three of my felines were in the same room with me, I said something to Ciati, my only female. She looked at me, as usual, but the boys looked at her. I already knew that each knew their own name, but I hadn’t witnessed them knowing each others’ name. This new data called for a name-recognition survey.

I addressed Fred by name and said what a good boy he was. As usual, Fred looked up at me then, Ciati and Laptop looked at him. Oh-h-h!

I took my experiment all the way. I called Laptop by name and told him he was also a good boy. Laptop looked at me, and Fred and Ciati looked at him. So-o-o cute! How smart! But then, why shouldn’t they know each other’s name. I call them by name a dozen times a day:

“My boy, Fred.” “Fred’s a handsome boy.” “Fred Astaire!”

“I love my Laptop.” “Laptop’s a good boy.” “Bad behavior, Laptop!”

“Ciati’s a pretty girl.” “Ciati’s my best girl.” “Ciati!”

A secondary reason for my happiness is from a choice to forget offenses, forgive, and look for rainbows during the rain. Sure, there are occasional disability downers, but they pass. I don’t let bad memories spoil my happiness. I’ve chosen to cast them to the wind. In fact, I’m a firm believer that Saturn’s rings comprise bad memories, the other sock, and ALL my unintentionally deleted emails, articles, messages, and manuscripts. I’m a very, very, VERY happy girl!

What’s your ‘happy pill?’

 

 

Living With A Disability

How do you, live with a disability? I think we live as any regular person lives, though a little differently.

I advanced my education after my car wreck. Instead of walking, I rolled to my classes. Later, I was hired as a speech and language pathologist in a school for special children. Due to the diversity of speech and language disorders, I scheduled much of my caseload in individual sessions, or as one-on-ones.

On a particular day, this seven year old, who didn’t want to be in school, decided his session was over. I saw it coming; he had previously used me as target practice with a metal toy truck (one of several vehicles) I was using to teach vocabulary for modes of transportation.

Seated across the table in front of me, he rose from his chair—wearing the face I knew so well—and backed across the room until he reached the wall, never once breaking eye contact with me or even acknowledging my request to return to his seat. Challenging me, he stood firm.

I backed from under the table and wheeled left toward its end. Before I could round the table to guide him back to his seat, he ran to the table’s right end. I backed up and headed toward the right end. He scurried back to the left, never taking his eyes off me.

I knew I could not win this stand-off. I rolled over to the intercom, buzzed the principal’s office, and requested his audience, by name. Instantaneously, David had a change of heart, breaking the sound barrier to get into his chair. After that incident, I was assigned an aide for a couple of my unruly students.

With this one exception, children have always shown a compassionate understanding of my disability. I never had children, but I sat for everyone else’s.

When I requested that they not go upstairs, outside, or anywhere that I couldn’t be with them, they complied. Since I couldn’t pick them up, I taught them the two-step-climb up into my lap. This was a multi-purpose skill, not only for reading stories, or to love on them, but also to assist them onto my dining room table to change a dirty diaper. Yes, it’s a little unorthodox (I always sterilized the table surface afterward.), but the joy was the same, and the job was accomplished.

With children, here are two perks of having a parent, sibling, or friend, living with a disability. The first is: They can develop early language skills because we talk them through most developmental tasks, i.e., learning to dress, and give directions for performance abilities (keeping their rooms straight and floors clear of toys; if not, we can’t step over things to put them to bed.).

The second is: Their confidence and independence—doing things for themselves, and us—set them up for success, as well as nourishing a sensitivity and consideration for all others.

I think we do rather well living with a disability, thank you very much.

Remember, R.S.V.P.