HE IS RISEN!

PHOTO He IS Risen dove

Taking communion, I imagine the intense grief Jesus’ mother must have experienced…watching her son ripped apart within one lash of death…dripping blood and sweat as He drug the cross upon his lacerated body to Golgotha…withstanding the excruciating piercings of four stakes, intensified by the countless reverberations of hammer to nail…and, watching helplessly as the cross was raised. Considering her knowledge that Roman crucifixion was the cruelest of pain, she must have prayed for God to have mercy and hasten his death. I would have.

But, have you ever wondered why Jesus never cried out in pain for help to endure? Because He had already had that conversation in Gethsemane. (Matthew 26:36-39) And, unless He had had a change of heart, He knew He couldn’t cry out for rescue…a flight of angels would have instantly been there to do so.

So, He was silent, except for the anguish over His Father turning His back on Him: “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?” (Matthew 27:46) It was the first and only time in all eternity that He was separated from His Heavenly Father…for you, and for me.

As you break bread, might you remind God of each wound Jesus suffered, and claim its healing: the crown of thorns for His mental clarity, to hear His direction, to know His will, and to receive Holy inspiration (mental/psychological/spiritual healing); the stripes on His back for physical healing; the sword wound under His heart to receive emotional healing of yours; the stake piercings in His hands that the work of your hands (your efforts) are guided and blessed; the stake piercings in His feet that He lights and directs your path (destiny/purpose). And, as you partake of the communion wine/juice, remember His blood sacrifice for the forgiveness of your sins.

“At the time of His death, as Jesus became the atonement for human sin, the holy veil was ripped in the temple (Matt 27:50-51), giving us access to God.

“But on a hill far away a Lamb-turned-Lion descended into this death camp through the portal of Golgotha. Crashing through the gates of hell, He met the dark prince in the mother of all battles. With three spikes and a thorny crown, the Captain of the Host conquered the devil. . .

For with His blood the Holy One of Radiance purchased rotten, ragged sinners and recreated us into His righteous reigning saints!”-Abhesik Rai with YWAM

CONFESS: “Thank you, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, that You were thinking of me at Golgotha. I AM healed, whole, forgiven, redeemed, lead, and sanctified in You, Jesus. I AM victorious!”

Here’s a graphic reminder with scenes from “The Passion of The Christ” to the background of “Mary did you know?” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikUovryDh80

HE IS RISEN!

In a way, Easter is a birthday celebration. Jesus’ calculated birth is said to have been between March 21st and May 29th, April 24th being between. As for the date we celebrate His birth, December 25th, it seems that date was borrowed from pagan holidays. It was thought that more pagans would be open to that god if it coincided with their holidays. So, in truth, spring marks Jesus’ birth into the world, as well as His death and resurrection out of it.

For my Easter article, and since today is Good Friday, I want to share a posting from Kari Browning, author of Unsealing Ancient Mysteries, clarifying some other misconceptions:

“In some Christian congregations, “Good Friday” is celebrated as the day Jesus was crucified. Actually, Jesus had to be crucified on a Thursday in order for Him to be in the ground three days and three nights and to rise on the first day of the week (Sunday).

For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth. (Matthew 12:40)

Now on the first day of the week (Sunday) Mary Magdalene went to the tomb early, while it was still dark, and saw that the stone had been taken away from the tomb. (John 20:1)

So, why do we celebrate the crucifixion on “Good Friday” if Jesus was actually crucified on a Thursday? The confusion is because the Church, for the most part, does not understand festival language or Hebraic customs.

This confusion stems from John 19:31, that states Jesus’ body had to be taken down from the cross because the next day was the Sabbath. The first day of the Festival of Unleavened Bread is considered a Shabbaton (a high Sabbath). This verse wasn’t referring to the weekly Sabbath (Friday at Sundown to Saturday at Sundown), but to the high Sabbath that was on Friday, Aviv 15, that year.”

HE IS RISEN!

(To learn more and understand the festival language of the Bible, you can purchase Kari’s book, Unsealing Ancient Mysteries, on Amazon.)